Susan Rogan Hearingurges teens to test hearingSPONSORED BYGo DIGITALcovered by insurance. If there are any hearingdifficulties in the future, the baseline helps forcomparison. Students playing musical instruments, such as in a marching band or for recreSUSANROGANments sucn as in a mardcation, should be checkedHEARINGna Kraman elitterenceHearing loss has risen 31 percent in teenag-She advises teens to protect their hearingthroughout their lifetime. Suggestions includelistening to music at normal levels, whetherthrough headphones or in-ear earbuds. Wearinghear the dithe ditterenceBy Gina Kramanear protection in loud environments, such asconcerts, clubs, and sporting events, helps prevent problems. If possible, move to the middleof the music venue and away from loud speakersto limit noise exposure. If you have to yell to beheard in an environment, it's too loud and mayt problemsers in recent years, according to the AmericanSpeech-Language-Hearng Association (ASHA)With 90 percent of teens using portable listening devices, it's not unreasonable to expectan acceleration of changes in hearing, and thes using portable lis to lmit noise excause damage.Rogan adds, "Friends should help friendsIf you can hear your buddies' music over theirear buds, it's too loud. Help them protect theirneed for hearing aids at much younger age."ASHA reports that hearing loss is linked totwo factors: age and noise. When studyingteenagers, age-related issues are factored out, ea 3 tods are factored out, hearing, too.and noise becomes the main culprit. Loud movie theaters, video games, appliances, and trafficcan create too much noiseIf teens experience hearing difficulties, suchas persistent ringing or buzzing in their earsthey should consult an audiologist for treatmentto limit further damageMuch noise-induced hearing loss can beprevented with safe health practicesFor more information, contact SusanRogan Hearing, (630) 969-1677 for theAudiologist Dr. Susan Rogan, Susan RoganHearing, who practices in Westmont and La-|Grange Park, says, "It's never too early to get a Westmont office, (708) 588-0155 forbaseline audiogram, which tests hearing levels.The test takes about 20 minutes and is usuallyLaGrange Park, or visit www.susanro-ganhearing.com.

Date: July 11, 2017

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Susan Rogan Hearing urges teens to test hearing SPONSORED BY Go DIGITAL covered by insurance. If there are any hearing difficulties in the future, the baseline helps for comparison. Students playing musical instru ments, such as in a marching band or for recre SUSAN ROGAN ments sucn as in a mardc ation, should be checked HEARING na Kraman elitterence Hearing loss has risen 31 percent in teenag- She advises teens to protect their hearing throughout their lifetime. Suggestions include listening to music at normal levels, whether through headphones or in-ear earbuds. Wearing hear the di the ditterence By Gina Kraman ear protection in loud environments, such as concerts, clubs, and sporting events, helps pre vent problems. If possible, move to the middle of the music venue and away from loud speakers to limit noise exposure. If you have to yell to be heard in an environment, it's too loud and may t problems ers in recent years, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearng Association (ASHA) With 90 percent of teens using portable lis tening devices, it's not unreasonable to expect an acceleration of changes in hearing, and the s using portable lis to lmit noise ex cause damage. Rogan adds, "Friends should help friends If you can hear your buddies' music over their ear buds, it's too loud. Help them protect their need for hearing aids at much younger age." ASHA reports that hearing loss is linked to two factors: age and noise. When studying teenagers, age-related issues are factored out, ea 3 tod s are factored out, hearing, too. and noise becomes the main culprit. Loud mov ie theaters, video games, appliances, and traffic can create too much noise If teens experience hearing difficulties, such as persistent ringing or buzzing in their ears they should consult an audiologist for treatment to limit further damage Much noise-induced hearing loss can be prevented with safe health practices For more information, contact Susan Rogan Hearing, (630) 969-1677 for the Audiologist Dr. Susan Rogan, Susan Rogan Hearing, who practices in Westmont and La- |Grange Park, says, "It's never too early to get a Westmont office, (708) 588-0155 for baseline audiogram, which tests hearing levels. The test takes about 20 minutes and is usually LaGrange Park, or visit www.susanro- ganhearing.com.