IS SPARKLING WATERBAD FOR MY TEETH?Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparklingwater putting you at risk for tooth decay? Becauseany drink with carbonation-including sparklingwater-has a higher acid level,questioned whether sipping sparkling water willweaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell ofyour teeth where cavities first form)some reports haveAccording to available research, sparkling wateris generally fine for your teeth-and here's why:in a study using teeth that were removed asa part of treatment and donated for research,researchers tested to see whether sparkling waterwould attack tooth enamel more aggressivelythan regular lab water. The result? The two formsof water were about the same in their effects ontooth enamel. This finding suggests that, eventhough sparkling water is slightly more acidicthan ordinary water, it's all just water to yourteethEliminating sugary beverages from our dietswould be best, but reducing the number of sugarybeverages you consume and substituting healthieroptions with less sugar is already a step in theright direction. The following-water, unsweetenedtea, milk, plain sparkling water, and diluted juice-are all better choicesThese drinks have little or no sugar. That meansthey won't give the bacteria in your mouth achance to cause trouble and make acid thatcan damage your teeth. Water can also containfluoride, which protects teeth against cavities.The calcium in milk also helps keep your teethstrong. If you or your children are allergic tocow's milk, try unsweetened milk substitute (suchas almond, soy, rice) with added calciumPresented as a service to the community byDr. Barbara Webster1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515630-663-0554SM-CL1673884 IS SPARKLING WATER BAD FOR MY TEETH? Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form) some reports have According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why: in a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth Eliminating sugary beverages from our diets would be best, but reducing the number of sugary beverages you consume and substituting healthier options with less sugar is already a step in the right direction. The following-water, unsweetened tea, milk, plain sparkling water, and diluted juice- are all better choices These drinks have little or no sugar. That means they won't give the bacteria in your mouth a chance to cause trouble and make acid that can damage your teeth. Water can also contain fluoride, which protects teeth against cavities. The calcium in milk also helps keep your teeth strong. If you or your children are allergic to cow's milk, try unsweetened milk substitute (such as almond, soy, rice) with added calcium Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1673884

Date: July 10, 2019

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IS SPARKLING WATER BAD FOR MY TEETH? Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form) some reports have According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why: in a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth Eliminating sugary beverages from our diets would be best, but reducing the number of sugary beverages you consume and substituting healthier options with less sugar is already a step in the right direction. The following-water, unsweetened tea, milk, plain sparkling water, and diluted juice- are all better choices These drinks have little or no sugar. That means they won't give the bacteria in your mouth a chance to cause trouble and make acid that can damage your teeth. Water can also contain fluoride, which protects teeth against cavities. The calcium in milk also helps keep your teeth strong. If you or your children are allergic to cow's milk, try unsweetened milk substitute (such as almond, soy, rice) with added calcium Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1673884 IS SPARKLING WATER BAD FOR MY TEETH? Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form) some reports have According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why: in a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth Eliminating sugary beverages from our diets would be best, but reducing the number of sugary beverages you consume and substituting healthier options with less sugar is already a step in the right direction. The following-water, unsweetened tea, milk, plain sparkling water, and diluted juice- are all better choices These drinks have little or no sugar. That means they won't give the bacteria in your mouth a chance to cause trouble and make acid that can damage your teeth. Water can also contain fluoride, which protects teeth against cavities. The calcium in milk also helps keep your teeth strong. If you or your children are allergic to cow's milk, try unsweetened milk substitute (such as almond, soy, rice) with added calcium Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1673884

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