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    July 14, 2021
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MECHANISM LINKING GUM DISEASE TO HEART DISEASE, OTHER INFLAMMATORY CONDITIONS DISCOVERED The link between periodontal (gum) disease and other inflammatory conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has long been established, but the mechanism behind that association has, until now, remained a mystery. A team of scientists say they've found the reason why - and it's related to the body's own hyperactive immune response. Science has already established that the state of your oral health is an important indicator of overall health. There are statistically significant correlations between periodontitis (oral inflammatory disease) and systemic diseases ranging from diabetes to cardiovascular diseases. To find what links those conditions, the researchers focused on the behaviors of cells primarily activated by gum disease: neutrophils, which are cells of the innate immune system. Through in vivo models, the researchers found that the immune system releases an abundance of these neutrophils to tackle the bacterial infections responsible for periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease. Activated to fight an oral infection, a systemic effect was noted: once periodontal inflammation was present, an overabundance of neutrophils circulated, 'primed' for attack. The hypervigilant immune system then responds with an excess of force to any secondary infection. That's when the body becomes susceptible to damage from secondary inflammatory conditions. With the immune system already primed by the neutrophils for attack, a secondary event causes those immune cells to destroy affected tissues and organs. The study 's findings underscore the importance of oral health as a vital indicator of potential complications for other inflammatory conditions, as well as disease model outcomes. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 B19E6BI1D-WS MECHANISM LINKING GUM DISEASE TO HEART DISEASE, OTHER INFLAMMATORY CONDITIONS DISCOVERED The link between periodontal (gum) disease and other inflammatory conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has long been established, but the mechanism behind that association has, until now, remained a mystery. A team of scientists say they've found the reason why - and it's related to the body's own hyperactive immune response. Science has already established that the state of your oral health is an important indicator of overall health. There are statistically significant correlations between periodontitis (oral inflammatory disease) and systemic diseases ranging from diabetes to cardiovascular diseases. To find what links those conditions, the researchers focused on the behaviors of cells primarily activated by gum disease: neutrophils, which are cells of the innate immune system. Through in vivo models, the researchers found that the immune system releases an abundance of these neutrophils to tackle the bacterial infections responsible for periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease. Activated to fight an oral infection, a systemic effect was noted: once periodontal inflammation was present, an overabundance of neutrophils circulated, 'primed' for attack. The hypervigilant immune system then responds with an excess of force to any secondary infection. That's when the body becomes susceptible to damage from secondary inflammatory conditions. With the immune system already primed by the neutrophils for attack, a secondary event causes those immune cells to destroy affected tissues and organs. The study 's findings underscore the importance of oral health as a vital indicator of potential complications for other inflammatory conditions, as well as disease model outcomes. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 B19E6BI1D-WS