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    July 21, 2021
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RESEARCHERS FIND ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ORAL BACTERIA AND ESOPHAGEAL CANCER In a new study, researchers have found a bacterial species responsible for gum disease is present in 61 percent of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The esophagus, a muscular tube critical to the movement of food from the mouth to the stomach, is lined with two main kinds of cells, thus there are two main types of esophageal cancer: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The researchers found the presence of P. gingivalis correlated with other factors, including cancer cell differentiation, metastasis and overall survival rate. There are two likely explanations: either ESCC cells are a preferred niche for P. gingivalis to thrive or the infection of P. gingivalis facilitates the development of esophageal cancer. If the former is true, simple antibiotics may prove useful or researchers can develop other therapeutic approaches for esophageal cancer utilizing genetic technology to target the P. gingivalis and ultimately destroy the cancer cells. Should P. gingivalis prove to cause ESCC, the implications are enomous, as it would suggest that improving oral hygiene may reduce ESCC risk; screening for P. gingivalis in dental plaque may identify susceptible subjects; and using antibiotics or other anti-bacterial strategies may prevent ESCC progression. According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 15,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with esophageal cancer each year. As with most cancers, there are a number of risk factors including chemical exposure, diet, heredity and age. It is somewhat difficult to diagnosis this cancer early, and it is characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 619E6BI1D-WS RESEARCHERS FIND ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ORAL BACTERIA AND ESOPHAGEAL CANCER In a new study, researchers have found a bacterial species responsible for gum disease is present in 61 percent of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The esophagus, a muscular tube critical to the movement of food from the mouth to the stomach, is lined with two main kinds of cells, thus there are two main types of esophageal cancer: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The researchers found the presence of P. gingivalis correlated with other factors, including cancer cell differentiation, metastasis and overall survival rate. There are two likely explanations: either ESCC cells are a preferred niche for P. gingivalis to thrive or the infection of P. gingivalis facilitates the development of esophageal cancer. If the former is true, simple antibiotics may prove useful or researchers can develop other therapeutic approaches for esophageal cancer utilizing genetic technology to target the P. gingivalis and ultimately destroy the cancer cells. Should P. gingivalis prove to cause ESCC, the implications are enomous, as it would suggest that improving oral hygiene may reduce ESCC risk; screening for P. gingivalis in dental plaque may identify susceptible subjects; and using antibiotics or other anti-bacterial strategies may prevent ESCC progression. According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 15,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with esophageal cancer each year. As with most cancers, there are a number of risk factors including chemical exposure, diet, heredity and age. It is somewhat difficult to diagnosis this cancer early, and it is characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 619E6BI1D-WS