Advertisement

  • Published Date

    September 16, 2021
    This ad was originally published on this date and may contain an offer that is no longer valid. To learn more about this business and its most recent offers, click here.

Ad Text

MEDICATIONS AND DRY MOUTH Hundreds of drugs are known to cause mouth (oral) problems. Medicines used to treat cancer, high blood pressure, severe pain, depression, allergies, and even the common cold, can have a negative impact on your dental health. That's why your dentist, not just your doctor, should always know about all the medications you are talking, including over-the-counter products, vitamins, and supplements. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia) Some drugs can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, causing an uncomfortably dry mouth (xerostomia). Without enough saliva, the tissues in the mouth can become irritated and inflamed. This increases your risk for infection, tooth decay, and gum disease. More than 400 medications are known to cause dry mouth. Dry mouth is also a side effect of certain chemotherapy medicines. Some medicines that list dry mouth as a side effect include: antihistamines; antidepressants; antipsychotics; Parkinson's disease medications; Alzheimer's disease medications; lung inhalers; certain blood pressure and heart medications, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, heart rhythm medications, and diuretics; seizure medications; isotretinoin, used to treat acne; anti-anxiety medications; anti-nausea and anti-diarrheal medicines; narcotic pain medications; scopolamine, used to prevent motion sickness; and anti-spasm medications. Dry mouth can be a bothersome problem. However, many times, the benefits of using a medicine outweigh the risks and discomfort of dry mouth. Drinking plenty of water or chewing sugarless gum may help relieve your symptoms. Saliva substitutes, such as those you spray into your mouth, may also be effective. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1911328 MEDICATIONS AND DRY MOUTH Hundreds of drugs are known to cause mouth (oral) problems. Medicines used to treat cancer, high blood pressure, severe pain, depression, allergies, and even the common cold, can have a negative impact on your dental health. That's why your dentist, not just your doctor, should always know about all the medications you are talking, including over-the-counter products, vitamins, and supplements. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia) Some drugs can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, causing an uncomfortably dry mouth (xerostomia). Without enough saliva, the tissues in the mouth can become irritated and inflamed. This increases your risk for infection, tooth decay, and gum disease. More than 400 medications are known to cause dry mouth. Dry mouth is also a side effect of certain chemotherapy medicines. Some medicines that list dry mouth as a side effect include: antihistamines; antidepressants; antipsychotics; Parkinson's disease medications; Alzheimer's disease medications; lung inhalers; certain blood pressure and heart medications, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, heart rhythm medications, and diuretics; seizure medications; isotretinoin, used to treat acne; anti-anxiety medications; anti-nausea and anti-diarrheal medicines; narcotic pain medications; scopolamine, used to prevent motion sickness; and anti-spasm medications. Dry mouth can be a bothersome problem. However, many times, the benefits of using a medicine outweigh the risks and discomfort of dry mouth. Drinking plenty of water or chewing sugarless gum may help relieve your symptoms. Saliva substitutes, such as those you spray into your mouth, may also be effective. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1911328