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    March 10, 2022
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PARESTHESIA "Pins and needles" is one way to describe the sensation of paresthesia. It is a combination tingly, numb sensation that occurs most commonly in the hands and feet. We often say our limbs are "falling asleep." But the sensation can also occur around the mouth in the form of numbness in the chin, lip, tongue or cheek. It may set in after a dental procedure that requires anesthesia. Most commonly, it will occur in the lower jaw after removal of a wisdom tooth. It can happen after any difficult tooth extraction, and occasionally after even a relatively routine, nonsurgical procedure. Paresthesia is generally a temporary condition, but it's been known to continue for weeks, even months. Because it causes a loss of feeling the lip or tongue, paresthesia can lead to drooling and the accidental biting of the tongue and lips. It can also affect the ability to taste and to assess temperature sensations in the mouth. Usually the cause for the onset of paresthesia is damage to one or more nerves, usually the mandibular, or lower- jaw, nerve. Some studies have found that the condition may also be brought on by the particular type of anesthesia used in a surgical dental procedure. For more information on the condition known as paresthesia, talk with your dentist. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960174 PARESTHESIA "Pins and needles" is one way to describe the sensation of paresthesia. It is a combination tingly, numb sensation that occurs most commonly in the hands and feet. We often say our limbs are "falling asleep." But the sensation can also occur around the mouth in the form of numbness in the chin, lip, tongue or cheek. It may set in after a dental procedure that requires anesthesia. Most commonly, it will occur in the lower jaw after removal of a wisdom tooth. It can happen after any difficult tooth extraction, and occasionally after even a relatively routine, nonsurgical procedure. Paresthesia is generally a temporary condition, but it's been known to continue for weeks, even months. Because it causes a loss of feeling the lip or tongue, paresthesia can lead to drooling and the accidental biting of the tongue and lips. It can also affect the ability to taste and to assess temperature sensations in the mouth. Usually the cause for the onset of paresthesia is damage to one or more nerves, usually the mandibular, or lower- jaw, nerve. Some studies have found that the condition may also be brought on by the particular type of anesthesia used in a surgical dental procedure. For more information on the condition known as paresthesia, talk with your dentist. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960174