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    March 17, 2022
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PEOPLE WITH SEVERE GUM DISEASE MAY BE TWICE AS LIKELY TO HAVE INCREASED BLOOD PRESSURE Adults with periodontitis, a severe gum infection, may be significantly more likely to have higher blood pressure compared to individuals who had healthy gums, according to new research. Previous studies have found an association between hypertension and periodontitis. Research confirming the details of this association, however, is scarce. Periodontitis is an infection of the gum tissues that hold teeth in place that can lead to progressive inflammation, bone or tooth loss. Prevention and treatment of periodontitis is cost effective and can lead to reduction of systemic markers of inflammation as well as improvement in function of the endothelium (thin membrane lining the inside of the heart and blood vessels). The study included 250 adults with generalized, severe periodontitis (50% of teeth measured with gum infection) and a control group of 250 adults who did not have severe gum disease, all of whom were otherwise healthy and had no other chronic health conditions. The researchers found that a diagnosis of gum disease was associated with higher odds of hypertension, independent of common cardiovascular risk factors. Individuals with gum disease were twice as likely to have high systolic blood pressure values compared to people with healthy gums (14% and 7%, respectively). Researchers also found: The presence of active gum inflammation (identified by bleeding gums) was associated with higher systolic blood pressure. Participants with periodontitis exhibited increased glucose, LDL ("bad" cholesterol), hsCRP and white blood cell levels, and lower HDL ("good" cholesterol) levels compared to those in the control group. Nearly 50% of participants with gum disease and 42% of the control group had blood pressure values for a diagnosis of hypertension. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960175 PEOPLE WITH SEVERE GUM DISEASE MAY BE TWICE AS LIKELY TO HAVE INCREASED BLOOD PRESSURE Adults with periodontitis, a severe gum infection, may be significantly more likely to have higher blood pressure compared to individuals who had healthy gums, according to new research. Previous studies have found an association between hypertension and periodontitis. Research confirming the details of this association, however, is scarce. Periodontitis is an infection of the gum tissues that hold teeth in place that can lead to progressive inflammation, bone or tooth loss. Prevention and treatment of periodontitis is cost effective and can lead to reduction of systemic markers of inflammation as well as improvement in function of the endothelium (thin membrane lining the inside of the heart and blood vessels). The study included 250 adults with generalized, severe periodontitis (50% of teeth measured with gum infection) and a control group of 250 adults who did not have severe gum disease, all of whom were otherwise healthy and had no other chronic health conditions. The researchers found that a diagnosis of gum disease was associated with higher odds of hypertension, independent of common cardiovascular risk factors. Individuals with gum disease were twice as likely to have high systolic blood pressure values compared to people with healthy gums (14% and 7%, respectively). Researchers also found: The presence of active gum inflammation (identified by bleeding gums) was associated with higher systolic blood pressure. Participants with periodontitis exhibited increased glucose, LDL ("bad" cholesterol), hsCRP and white blood cell levels, and lower HDL ("good" cholesterol) levels compared to those in the control group. Nearly 50% of participants with gum disease and 42% of the control group had blood pressure values for a diagnosis of hypertension. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960175