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    March 24, 2022
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BACTERIA THAT CAUSE PERIODONTITIS ARE TRANSMITTED FROM PARENTS TO CHILDREN Adults with periodontitis transmit bacteria that can cause the disease in future to their children, and the bacteria remain in the oral cavity even when the children undergo treatment of various kinds, reinforcing the need for preventive care in the first year of a baby's life. This is the main conclusion of a new study. Periodontitis is an inflammation of the periodontium, the tissue that supports the teeth and maintains them in the maxillary and mandibular bones. The disease is triggered by bacterial infection. Symptoms include bleeding of the gums and halitosis. In severe cases, it leads to bone and tooth loss. If the bacteria or other microorganisms that cause the disease enter the bloodstream, they may trigger other kinds of inflammation in the body. Treatment includes cleaning of the pockets around teeth by a dentist or hygienist and administration of antiflammatory drugs or antibiotics. "The parents' oral microbiome is a determinant of the subgingival microbial colonization of their children," the article's authors state in their conclusions, adding that "dysbiotic microbiota acquired by children of periodontitis patients at an early age are resilient to shift and the community structure is maintained even after controlling the hygiene status." Parents should start caring for the health of their children's gums when they are infants. This pioneering study compares parents with and without periodontitis. In children of the former, the authors found subgingival bacterial colonization at a very early age. However, 'inheriting' the problem doesn't mean a child is fated to develop the disease in adulthood. Hence the importance of keeping an eye open for the smallest signs and seeking specialized help. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960176 BACTERIA THAT CAUSE PERIODONTITIS ARE TRANSMITTED FROM PARENTS TO CHILDREN Adults with periodontitis transmit bacteria that can cause the disease in future to their children, and the bacteria remain in the oral cavity even when the children undergo treatment of various kinds, reinforcing the need for preventive care in the first year of a baby's life. This is the main conclusion of a new study. Periodontitis is an inflammation of the periodontium, the tissue that supports the teeth and maintains them in the maxillary and mandibular bones. The disease is triggered by bacterial infection. Symptoms include bleeding of the gums and halitosis. In severe cases, it leads to bone and tooth loss. If the bacteria or other microorganisms that cause the disease enter the bloodstream, they may trigger other kinds of inflammation in the body. Treatment includes cleaning of the pockets around teeth by a dentist or hygienist and administration of antiflammatory drugs or antibiotics. "The parents' oral microbiome is a determinant of the subgingival microbial colonization of their children," the article's authors state in their conclusions, adding that "dysbiotic microbiota acquired by children of periodontitis patients at an early age are resilient to shift and the community structure is maintained even after controlling the hygiene status." Parents should start caring for the health of their children's gums when they are infants. This pioneering study compares parents with and without periodontitis. In children of the former, the authors found subgingival bacterial colonization at a very early age. However, 'inheriting' the problem doesn't mean a child is fated to develop the disease in adulthood. Hence the importance of keeping an eye open for the smallest signs and seeking specialized help. Presented as a service to the community by Dr. Barbara Webster 1121 Warren Ave., Suite 130, Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-663-0554 SM-CL1960176